How it should go when you ask your doctor to remove an IUD

While some women report getting push back from their doctors when they request to have their intrauterine device (IUD) or other birth control implant removed, the right response should be to affirm the patient’s request.

According to an instructional video published by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), providers counseling patients who have requested a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) removal should validate patients’ concerns and offer to remove it in the same visit.

In the ACOG video, a provider and patient discuss a patient’s request to get her birth control implant removed.

“I really want my implant out,” the patient says, citing a common side effect. “I’m really tired of the bleeding. I thought that I could handle it, but it’s driving me crazy.”

“I’m sorry you’re having that side effect,” the provider responds. “One of the things we can talk about is ways to treat that bleeding… otherwise we could just take the implant out.”

“I think I just want to take a break from everything and have my implant out,” the patient responds. It’s clear she has made up her mind.

“Okay, great. Why don’t we go ahead and get that removed for you today.”

The patient’s concerns in this video illustrate commonly cited concerns from women who experience bad side effects from the IUD.

If you are experiencing negative side effects from a long-acting reversible contraceptive such as the copper IUD (Paragard®) or hormonal IUD (Mirena®, Lilleta®, Kyleena®), know that according to ACOG’s video, your request should be honored by your provider, and prepare to advocate for yourself.

If you receive push back from your doctor or feel that your symptoms are not taken seriously, we encourage you to seek a second opinion. You can also share your story.